Gary Pronman
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Home Rebuttal   Dan Pronman's 06/22/2010 Story

On 6/22/1010, Dan Pronman, a defendant in my case, posted what appears to be his side of the story on another website. While Dan did not directly provide this text directly to me, he did make it public and I felt it was my obligation to post a copy here:

Dan & Gary Pronman, The Truth
 
My brother Gary Pronman and I, Dan Pronman, own Movie Star Muscle Cars, an upstanding business that enjoyed a great reputation for many years until Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, began publishing inaccurate statements about us on his website. What has turned into a very complicated lawsuit is really a basic business deal with a breach of an oral contract concerning the sale of a 1969 1/2 Superbee ("the car") that transpired like this:

Gary Pronman, on behalf of Movie Star Muscle Cars offered to sell Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, a car for $84,000.00. Accordingly, Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, paid $84,000.00 to Movie Star Muscle Cars. Immediately after the payment was received, Gary Pronman tendered the car as promised and offered to arrange for drop off of the car at a location of Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, choosing. Although Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, did not bargain for the car to be in the United States, or said differently, for the car not to be in Canada, Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, complained that the car is in Canada and about the $295.00 broker fee to have the car titled in the United States. Consequently, although he was not technically obligated to do so, Gary Pronman offered to pay the broker fee. Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, then wrote stating "that goes a long way in my book to making [the deal] better" and indicated that he is making arrangements to pick up the car. Gary Pronman wrote back "let me know what you want to do."

At the time of the sale, Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, asked if the car is "safe" and Gary Pronman promptly assured Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, "of course, you can sleep at night." However, about three (3) weeks after Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, purchased the car he asked Gary Pronman to sell the car for him and further stated that if this is not acceptable, he, Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, needs to figure a way to get the car out of Canada. Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic then failed to attempt to pick up the car for five (5) weeks after he purchased same and as a result Gary Pronman incurred expenses he did not bargain for related to transport, warehousing and insurance of the car necessary to keep it safe. When Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, finally inquired about the car, I presented him with an invoice for said transport, warehousing, and insurance expenses and likewise with other invoices related to earned broker fees related to five (5) additional cars that we contend Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, did not pay for on an open account. Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, however, did not even so much as offer to pay the expenses directly related to the car in question. Gary Pronman then withheld delivery of the car pursuant to his right to do so under Florida's Uniform Commercial Code that governs sellers' remedies for buyer breeched contracts for the sale of goods. Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, then sued Gary Pronman, myself, and our company alleging among other things, fraud and civil theft; published his website proclaiming "hell hath no fury like Brian Styles' scorn"; and began smearing our reputations on the worldwide web.

It should be noted that immediately after Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, initially purchased the car, Gary Pronman gratuitously tendered the car without requiring the payment of any past due invoices. The original email trail between Brian Styles and Gary Pronman documenting Gary's immediate tender of the car is as follows: (rather than reposting emails messages, you can find them in their latest motion to dismiss)

It should be noted that Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, has claimed that we did not own the car when we sold it to him. What he fails to mention, however, is that I entered into a binding contract with the original owner of the car to purchase same before Gary Pronman sold the car to Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic. Irrespective of that fact, pursuant to their oral contract, Gary Pronman merely promised Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, to sell him a 1969 1/2 Superbee for $84,000.00 and in fact sold him the Superbee as promised in the kind of garden variety commercial transaction that occurs millions of times a day in a free market economy. Consequently, as you read this, no one, including Gary Pronman, myself, and Movie Star Muscle Cars, has claimed or is claiming that Brian Styles does not legally own the car he bargained for as a result of the transaction described by Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, in his website. We merely contend that we have a valid lien on the car pursuant to Florida Law and are entitled to withhold delivery of same until Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, tenders payment on unpaid invoices, and in particular, the invoice directly related to protecting the car during the period Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, unreasonably failed to pickup same. Unfortunately, our incidental damages that directly relate to the size of the lien pursuant to Florida's Uniform Commercial Code continue to grow as the cost of the ongoing frivolous lawsuit brought by Brian Styles, Founder of Script Logic, accumulates and our reputations are further harmed by the publication of his untruthful statements.
 

Update: Dan is now claiming he didn't write the above verbiage that starts out with "My brother Gary Pronman and I, Dan Pronman, own Movie Star Muscle Cars..." On 07/21/2010 @ 29:36am, I received the following statement in an email from dansmopar@aol.com: "I am writing this email to clarify what we both know to be true. The text that you claim to be mine isn't. Just to be clear I didn't write that nor did I publish it." - Dan Pronman.

Confused? That makes two of us! Here's the same text with some highlighting of the first-person statements that would lead any sane person, including me, to believe that Dan did write it:

Dan & Gary Pronman, The Truth
 
My brother Gary Pronman and I, Dan Pronman, own Movie Star Muscle Cars, an upstanding business that enjoyed a great reputation for many years until Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, began publishing inaccurate statements about us on his website. What has turned into a very complicated lawsuit is really a basic business deal with a breach of an oral contract concerning the sale of a 1969 1/2 Superbee ("the car") that transpired like this:

Gary Pronman, on behalf of Movie Star Muscle Cars offered to sell Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, a car for $84,000.00. Accordingly, Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, paid $84,000.00 to Movie Star Muscle Cars. Immediately after the payment was received, Gary Pronman tendered the car as promised and offered to arrange for drop off of the car at a location of Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, choosing. Although Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, did not bargain for the car to be in the United States, or said differently, for the car not to be in Canada, Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, complained that the car is in Canada and about the $295.00 broker fee to have the car titled in the United States. Consequently, although he was not technically obligated to do so, Gary Pronman offered to pay the broker fee. Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, then wrote stating "that goes a long way in my book to making [the deal] better" and indicated that he is making arrangements to pick up the car. Gary Pronman wrote back "let me know what you want to do."

At the time of the sale, Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, asked if the car is "safe" and Gary Pronman promptly assured Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, "of course, you can sleep at night." However, about three (3) weeks after Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, purchased the car he asked Gary Pronman to sell the car for him and further stated that if this is not acceptable, he, Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, needs to figure a way to get the car out of Canada. Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic then failed to attempt to pick up the car for five (5) weeks after he purchased same and as a result Gary Pronman incurred expenses he did not bargain for related to transport, warehousing and insurance of the car necessary to keep it safe. When Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, finally inquired about the car, I presented him with an invoice for said transport, warehousing, and insurance expenses and likewise with other invoices related to earned broker fees related to five (5) additional cars that we contend Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, did not pay for on an open account. Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, however, did not even so much as offer to pay the expenses directly related to the car in question. Gary Pronman then withheld delivery of the car pursuant to his right to do so under Florida's Uniform Commercial Code that governs sellers' remedies for buyer breeched contracts for the sale of goods. Brian Styles, Founder of ScriptLogic, then sued Gary Pronman, myself, and our company alleging among other things, fraud and civil theft; published his website proclaiming "hell hath no fury like Brian Styles' scorn"; and began smearing our reputations on the worldwide web.

It should be noted that immediately after Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, initially purchased the car, Gary Pronman gratuitously tendered the car without requiring the payment of any past due invoices. The original email trail between Brian Styles and Gary Pronman documenting Gary's immediate tender of the car is as follows: (rather than reposting emails messages, you can find them in their latest motion to dismiss)

It should be noted that Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, has claimed that we did not own the car when we sold it to him. What he fails to mention, however, is that I entered into a binding contract with the original owner of the car to purchase same before Gary Pronman sold the car to Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic. Irrespective of that fact, pursuant to their oral contract, Gary Pronman merely promised Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, to sell him a 1969 1/2 Superbee for $84,000.00 and in fact sold him the Superbee as promised in the kind of garden variety commercial transaction that occurs millions of times a day in a free market economy. Consequently, as you read this, no one, including Gary Pronman, myself, and Movie Star Muscle Cars, has claimed or is claiming that Brian Styles does not legally own the car he bargained for as a result of the transaction described by Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, in his website. We merely contend that we have a valid lien on the car pursuant to Florida Law and are entitled to withhold delivery of same until Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, tenders payment on unpaid invoices, and in particular, the invoice directly related to protecting the car during the period Brian Styles, Founder of Scriptlogic, unreasonably failed to pickup same. Unfortunately, our incidental damages that directly relate to the size of the lien pursuant to Florida's Uniform Commercial Code continue to grow as the cost of the ongoing frivolous lawsuit brought by Brian Styles, Founder of Script Logic, accumulates and our reputations are further harmed by the publication of his untruthful statements.
 

 
 
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